Time flies when you’re making fun

By | artists, Craft, Minecarft, Raspberry Pi, sewing, sewing machine, stoke, Technology, young people | No Comments

Time just seems to be flying here at Wavemaker, it doesn’t seem two minutes since we welcomed in the New Year but six months seem to have flown by! May has been a particularly busy month, Maker Days are now in full swing, new groups are coming in for workshops and the last half term of the school year was lying in wait at the end of the month, which could only mean one thing. Workshops.

A workshop that I was particularly excited about was the Introduction to Sewing using a Machine, and I wasn’t only excited because I was leading the workshop…I’m not bias…I just love sewing and making. To prepare for the workshop I decided to do some CPD (Continuing Professional Development), and go to a sewing workshop to brush up on some skills. This workshop was run by Abakhan, a fabric shop and favourite Hanley haunt of mine. This particular session was at a store in Mostyn, North Wales. I say store, it was more of a converted farm complex, that boasted workshop rooms, hobby and fabric shops as well as a lovely cafe and gift shop. This CPD sounds terrible I know, and to make it even worse the sun was shining all day which made eating lunch outside unbearable…Who am I kidding, this is the best type of CPD I’ve ever done! Boasting aside, the workshop was extremely useful and laid to rest some fears around running my own sewing workshop, especially as this was the first one Wavemaker had ever done.

Back at Wavemaker, the sewing workshop day had arrived. The white machines stood proudly on the tables, the needles reflecting the rays of the early morning sun, ready to be reined by cotton thread like a cavalry of mechanical horses or metallic soldiers marching steadily across fabric fields, laying down line after line of stitching with military precision. Okay, maybe not military precision, the first class was specifically for parents and children after all, I could already hear the sound of the machines racing at breakneck speeds as foot pedals were pushed very firmly to the metal, the controller of the machine momentarily imagining themselves caught up in a Hollywood movie car chase, rather than creating a very fashionable and versatile accessory, the infinity scarf, or snood to those who know their Birkin’s from their Alexa’s.

These concerns aside, the day was a brilliant success. The parents and the children had a great time learning a new skill. The pride and sense of accomplishment of creating something out of nothing is a feeling that makes you truly happy. That moment when you finish, take a step back and admire your efforts, congratulate yourself at your ability to create does wonders for self-confidence, especially in children. That’s not to discredit the adults in the session in anyway, and in the all ages workshop that ran in the afternoon, theses feelings were reflected just as strongly. Helping to improve people’s skills and confidence is the underlying ethos of Wavemaker and I like to think in months and years to come, when our participants sit down in front of their trustee sewing steeds they will think back to their session, and my words will echo in their minds just like Mister Miyagi during the final fight scene in Karate Kid. Sorry I digress.

On Friday of half term, what is fast becoming one of Wavemaker’s most popular activities made an appearance, but this time with a twist. That activity is Minecraft. To those of you completely unaware of what this is, it is a computer game that allows you to build in a virtual world using pixel blocks. That is the extremely simplified version! The twist was that rather than building houses, bridges and towers made of rainbow glass they were making art using the pixel blocks and a Raspberry Pi. The young people who attended could create whatever they wanted within their Minecraft frame. We had Super Mario, Mushroom and Pokeball to name but a few. In the afternoon we went from computer screen to paper, with children designing pixel art on 16 x 16cm grids before copying these images using 1cm squared tiles glued into a wooden frame. The creativity and finished pieces were truly fantastic and really effective. It was great to create links between modern and more traditional mediums of art and making. The session was relaxing and yet productive, the young people walking away with an array of pixel art to proudly showcase and display on bedroom walls, a true testament to their creative skill and imagination .

All in all, half term was a really successful week and although the workshop output smaller than usual due to the Bank Holiday, the activities that we did run were thoroughly enjoyable. Wavemaker are now designing and putting together ideas for our summer activities programme, we are also open to suggestions, so if you have any ideas, get in touch by emailing info@wavemaker.org.uk.

Making waves while the sun shines

By | artists, digital, Laser cutting, stoke, Technology, Vinyl Cutting | No Comments

 

April has been a busy month here at Wavemaker, not least because we launched our new Maker Days, every Tuesday and Thursday 10am-5pm.

These two days give established makers and those just starting out on the road to makerdom the brilliant opportunity to come into our space, here on the top floor of the Mitchell Arts Centre in Hanley, and take advantage of our equipment, resources, great humour, fantastic hosting skills and modest nature (cough, cough!)

 

This month we have had a steady influx of makers and creatives, faces both new and also well established. We have had the pleasure of hosting the boys from Design by Weather as they wait to move into their new studio space at Spode. Our breakout space has doubled as a temporary office for the Weather team, and come rain or shine (Weather…get it?!) they have been steadily creating various website and graphic designs for local businesses and national projects.

 

Getting to grips with the laser cutter are our new members, Bret and Emma. Both working on different projects, Bret has been using the equipment to further develop ideas around creating 3D Minton tile designs for the visually impaired and Emma has been putting her Surface Pattern degree to great use by exploring different etching designs and effects. Both have been great additions to the Wavemaker space and we look forward to seeing how their research progresses.

 

Already established makers and creators in the city have also been in to try out our space. Local artists Deb Rogers laser cut some fab stencils for the new Art Stop in Stoke, which is a new creative co-working office and studio space for local arts organisations, The Cultural Sisters and Letting in the Light. If you haven’t had chance to get down there and check out Art Stop, you should do, it’s fantastic!

Another local artist who has been experimenting with the laser cutter is the lovely Nicola Winstanley, who came in to trial some ideas for a new art installation in the city. It has been great to start the first month of Maker Days off with artists from the city, using the equipment to benefit arts within the city. Long may it continue!

 

We have also had first year Birmingham City University student Liam in constructing his end of year design for his architecture degree. Liam, originally from Snyed Green, used plywood to create a model following his viewing platform brief. Through using the precision and speed of the laser cutter, he was able to start assembling something pretty amazing…let’s hope his lecturers feel the same way!

 

Another group who have been in to explore their creative flair, were the lovely ladies from the YMCA North Staffs based in Hanley. The girls created some fabulous pieces of jewellry and crafts during their maker session. We even saw some of these being sold at the monthly Community Meal hosted at the YMCA and sponsored each month by a local group or business. Alongside the meal, residents sell different items from knitted hats to ceramic crafts and CDs of original  music. It was brilliant to see the things they created here at Wavemaker being sold to the public and they enjoyed their time so much, that they will be back every fortnight to carry on creating!

 

With  a new sewing programme about to start here at Wavemaker, alongside our other offerings and Maker Days, April has definitely been a busy month and May is shaping up to be even more active. We have half term activities about to be revealed for the end of May, a new Code Club soon to be announced and yet more sessions to run with the truly talented people of Stoke, it’s definitely put a spring in our step.

 

Sonic Boom: Our Day with Sonic Pi creator Dr. Sam Aaron

By | Astro Pi, coding, Music, Raspberry Pi, Sonic Pi, young people | No Comments

In a world that is dominated by computers, software, apps and social media, coding is king. It is a skill that will only become more desirable, especially to employers around the world, whose businesses will continue to rely more and more on software and programming. And one man has created something that will inspire the coders of the future tenfold, and that man is Dr. Sam Aaron.

A relative unknown to those not submerged in the world of coding, Dr Sam Aaron has invented a means of teaching young people about coding through the most popular medium known to man, a medium that unites people and one which I haven’t met anyone yet in life that doesn’t enjoy, and that thing is music.

Sonic Pi is a piece of software that allows users to create live music using code, more specifically Ruby, for those of you aware of coding languages. Aaron is at the forefront of this new technology and as he personally invented the concept, we thought him the best person to deliver our Sonic Pi workshops that took place on Tuesday 5th April. Aaron spent the first eleven years of his life in Stoke-on-Trent, (yes, Stoke-on-Trent! Take that you Jason Mountford Stoke-on-Trent facebook post trollers) and now calls Cambridge home. Aaron has created Sonic Pi as an educational tool to encourage young people to become more involved in coding, it is also a funded project that is free to download online. Driving an underlying belief that children need to know why they are performing certain tasks within education and through using Sonic Pi, children get an immediate response to their code, this response being live music.

Here at Wavemaker, we were thrilled when Dr. Sam agreed to come into HQ at the Mitchell Arts Centre in Hanley and deliver not one but two amazing workshops. For coding and music enthusiasts, like ourselves, we had a celebrity in the world of coding coming to visit!

The first workshop that Sam delivered was to children and young people. It was a sell out session and gave the group an introduction to Sonic Pi and time to play in the software to create their very own composition, complete with with synths, effects and samples. The workshop highlighted some great coding and musical talent among the young people in the city. I wouldn’t be surprised, in time, if another Potter became an expert Sonic Pi DJ with world-wide fame, given the number of fantastic musical pieces that were created in that workshop.  

In essence, Dr. Sam is also a DJ and travels the world performing using Sonic Pi. Wavemaker were also introduced to Alga -Raves, dance nights across the country, that specifically play live coded music….it’s safe to say Wavemaker will be making an appearance at one of these in the near future!

The second workshop was aimed at adults, teachers and coding enthusiasts who wanted to know more about Sonic Pi at a more advanced level. The group included music technology lecturers from the local universities and colleges as well as those from a coding background. In this session Aaron demonstrated the lengths to which Sonic Pi can be used, how advanced the software is and just how amazing it is to listen to live coded music. With a small performance at the end of the session, Aaron really highlighted how mind-blowing this kind of music can be and also enjoyable.

In a lot of ways it is not only a skill but a true art form, a combination of something ancient in history, universal in enjoyment, combined with new technology that transcends the now common place turntable, apple mac DJ booth. To create live music in this way is truly a meeting of traditional and modern musical minds, and one which shows no sign of stopping in its popularity and growth. Sonic Pi is available to download for free for Microsoft and Mac, there is also learning resources available online for anyone who wants to give it a go. After such a fantastic experience, we are hoping to get Dr. Sam Aaron back to his homeland once more for a proper performance, a showcase for our already music loving and musically talented city of what the future holds. Watch this space.

out-landscape-blue

Is it Easter already?!

By | coding, Laser cutting, Minecarft, Music, robot wars, robotics, Sonic Pi, young people | No Comments

It’s been a busy Easter here at Wavemaker, two weeks filled with exciting and innovative activities….if we do say so ourselves!

 

Kicking off this chocolate marathon was our first workshop on Tuesday 29th March, Make you own Charm Bracelet. This workshop gave participants the opportunity to learn how to use Illustrator software to create custom charm designs, the laser cutter and then assemble their bracelet using jewellry tools. The session included both parents and their children working side-by-side to create, which was brilliant to see and something that we wholeheartedly encourage here at Wavemaker.

The session was a real success, and it was a great way to link technology with more traditional crafting skills, which is definitely a theme we hope to continue. By the end, everybody left the workshop with a bracelet adorned with personalised charms from stars and hearts to hamsters….yes hamsters…which strangely was a recurring theme throughout the week!

 

On Wednesday 30th it was the turn of a technology that has already had meteoric growth over the last few years and is set to boom in 2016, Virtual Reality. With Google launching the Google Cardboard in 2014/15 and smartphone technology now making virtual reality more accessible to the masses, this was an area of growing technology that Wavemaker felt needed exploring by the people of Stoke-on-Trent. Leading the session was Ollie and Sam from So Visual, a commercial photography company based in Stafford who also specialise in image stitching of your workspace/gym/home.

The workshop saw an influx of both parents and children, giving them the opportunity to build their own VR cardboard device and also feature in their own virtual reality environment, which was stitched together during the workshop. Using a special 180 degree fisheye lense and tripod, So Visual took photos of the group in a circle at 90 degree intervals and then stitched the images together to make our very own virtual reality mockup of our makerspace. Information about each person in the group was also written and then added to the VR environment so that pop-ups would appear when moving through the VR space. The session also gave the group information about the best VR applications available and there was also playtime, which allowed the group time to play in Virtual Reality and see whether their new assembled VR cardboard stood the test of virtual time.

Thursday’s workshop was a personal highlight for everyone at Wavemaker, a day that few here will forget. We were lucky enough to have one of the creators of the cult TV show Robot Wars host a session building small super antweight robots. John Findlay from Roaming Robots, now travels the country and internationally hosting robot competitions, events and workshops both public and private. John even made many a Robot Wars dream come true and bought in the world-famous Matilda for a meet and greet. For those of you don’t know Matilda, I suggest you look her up, (as a girl that grew up with two older brothers she was a personal hero.)

The session saw groups divide into teams, design and build their own ‘antweight’ robots. A robotic hamster also made an appearance, boasting a string tail and whiskers. Attention to detail was definitely high in that particular animal loving team. What followed was passion to rival any football derby or sporting competition, a head-to-head robot battle. The aim was to knock the opposing robot out of the sumo circle, best of three. Teams took it in turns to remotely control their robot, testing their design to the maximum in an effort to achieve eternal robot glory. The makerspace took on the atmosphere of an amphitheatre, adults and children alike cheering for their favourite cardboard gladiator. The three sessions that ran that day were fully booked and a day which Wavemaker will always remember.

 

This weekend was split exploring new emerging technology at the NEC’s Gadget Show and also hosting another hugely successful Building in Minecraft session, run in conjunction with the BBC Get Creative Day. This allowed young people across the city to come together and share their love of Minecraft in a two-hour free play and building session. Our next session will take place at the end of April so keep an eye on our facebook page and website. After all this weekend activity Wavemaker were ready for our second easter week of workshops. The first of these was Sonic Pi, hosted by its inventor Dr. Sam Aaron. This was such a momentous occasion for music and coding enthusiasts alike that I have created a blog post just for it. Check out Sonic Boom: A Day with Sonic Pi creator Dr. Sam Aaron for a full low down on that day’s events.

Last but in no means least was Wednesday 6th April workshop on Building your own Website in Weebly. The number of young people that attended this session was amazing, and they created some interesting and varied websites for you all to enjoy from football and rugby facts and figures to information on scratch coding and how to care for hamsters….yep told you it was a recurring theme!

 

All in all the Easter holiday has been a huge success, we have had new visitors to the space and have hosted some fabulous workshops, the likes of which have not been available in the city before. We will now pore over the feedback and begin to design a new programme for half term and also the summer, both of which we promise will offer workshops and experiences that you don’t want to miss!

 

mkr-banner-sewing

A Slice of Sonic Pi

By | Astro Pi, coding, digital, Music, Raspberry Pi, Sonic Pi, Technology, young people | No Comments

I’ve never thought of myself as particularly gifted when it comes to technology. For me, it conjures up images of old school workshops lined with heavy tools, the smell of sawdust and an aproned teacher, with a constant look of anxiety and exasperation etched across their face.

And Information Technology also left me scratching my head; unable to produce nothing more than a powerpoint or poster emblazoned with clipart. How times have changed.

Over the last ten years technology and our everyday interaction with it has grown beyond recognition. I have relatives under the age of seven that can operate a tablet better than I can, and whilst my parents generations keep up as best they can (my father has a hand-me-down iphone 1 which he would consider cutting edge) people of my generation have had no choice but to embrace it, if only to keep an eye on what the younger, cooler folk are doing.

Here at Wavemaker, technology and its evolution is something that drives everything that we try to do and offer. Gone are the tools and soldering irons (for now) and in their place stand laptops, a 3D printer and a laser cutter, which can do in minutes what would have taken you a whole term and multiple injuries to produce. And even though our end goal is provide a service that encourages creation through the more traditional, practical methods as well as digital technology,  it is with this digital technology that is our initial focus.

If you have never heard of Raspberry Pi or even Sonic Pi for that matter, don’t worry, you are not alone. In essence, Raspberry Pi is a credit card sized single board computer. It was developed in our very own UK (hoorah for us!) and is an affordable, innovative way for schools and young people to engage in computer science. You can write code, create programmes and even play Minecraft using one of these little Pi’s. Amazing! The thing that is truly brilliant though, is that this technology has been developed further and from this Sonic Pi evolved.

Sonic Pi has nothing to do with the hedgehog and everything to do with sound waves. Simply put Sonic Pi allows you to create music using live coding. It was created by Dr. Sam Aaron who….wait for it…..is actually from our very own Stoke-on-Trent! (Again another hoorah for us!)

With regards to computers, smartphones, apps, software, code controls it all. But this is code that has already been pre-written.  The difference with Sonic Pi, is that not only does it create sounds that can be composed into music, you create all of the code live, in that moment. There are options to use pre-produced samples, but these can then be used to accompany live coded music, just in the same way musicians sample songs to make new ones. Sonic Pi also includes countless synthesisers and FXs that can be used to make your creation even more interesting. Ameatur music production this is not, given time to master the various options available, anyone, even you, could become a Sonic Pi DJ extraordinaire.

Here at Wavemaker, we decided to run an Introduction to Sonic Pi session with some of the lovely young people at Unity School, who come to us every week to explore new technology. After talking through the basics using the fantastic resources available online, and having downloaded Sonic Pi to each laptop prior to the session (which is free and extremely easy to do) the guys were ready to go.

At the beginning of the session they had no idea what coding was or Sonic Pi for that matter, and after two hours of running through the very basics, they were experimenting with different sounds, producing short pieces of music and most importantly having fun, whilst learning a process that is behind every website, social media platform and smartphone application in the world.

Sonic Pi is definitely at the forefront of music technology, so much so, that it is leaving earth to explore the final frontier, actual space. The International Space Station to be exact, with our very own Tim Peake. Currently, schools all around the country are competing, to create a piece of Sonic Pi music, that will then be sent to space and played on the Astro Pi, a modified version of the Raspberry Pi and they only have until the 31st March to do so!

Although the music created by Unity won’t be going into space just yet, the morning was a still a brilliant success and we can’t wait to help improve the Sonic Pi skills of others (and ourselves) at our next Sonic Pi session. Ultimately, the Sonic Pi experience is just great fun and a million miles away from the computer science of old. If this is what the future holds for technology, we love it! Rave, House, Grime, Soul, Rock on!

bus-banner-education

Half Term Wavemaking Workshops

By | 3D design, 3D Printing, coding, Craft, digital, minecraft, Python, Raspberry Pi, robotics, Science | No Comments

For anyone who has ever watched the late 80’s film Field of Dreams starring Kevin Costner the phrase, ‘Build it and they will come,’ will be a familiar one. That is exactly how we felt here at Wavemaker when we decided to organise a half term activity programme, which took place last week here at the Mitchell Arts Centre. Okay, we weren’t building a baseball pitch for the deceased baseball legends of the past but the goal seemed at times just as far fetched. This was our first real foray into the world of workshops and offering the people of the city the opportunity to learn new and exciting skills.

 

The week was packed with range of different activities from Metal Embossing with the brilliant local artist Belinda Latimer, Robotics with Kai Longshaw one of our regular makers to computer coding using Python and Raspberry Pi, run by two contributors and coding wizards, Rich Steele and Sam Freeman. We even had Birmingham City University student and past Holden Lane pupil Liam Witham leading his first 3D Design workshop, using skills that he has honed during his study of Architecture.

 

To our delight all the workshops were received fantastically well, Mr. Costner knows best after all. We had a range of ages participate across the week, with parents even getting involved in the workshops, learning new skills alongside their children, which was brilliant to see.

 

The young people that attended were a pleasure to work with, and some even taught us new skills and techniques! Some who attended the morning introductory workshops even decided to stay on for the more advanced afternoon sessions, which was a true testament to the talent of the workshop leaders and interest they generated around their activity.

 

All in all in was a week of fun and learning for all involved, especially the Wavemaker team! Individually we learnt how to code using Raspberry Pi, how to assemble a robotic arm and how dangerous yet amusing TNT can be in a game of Minecraft.

 

As we start to evaluate the feedback from our half term week, we will endeavour to use this to structure our next holiday workshops sessions at Easter.

The popularity of some workshops, especially the group building in Minecraft, has prompted us to think about hosting more regular sessions throughout term time, including weekends so get your Minecraft t-shirts washed and ironed for that! Full information on this can be found on our website and Facebook as soon as they are announced in a few weeks time.

 

We built it and people came, what more could we have asked for. Massive thank you to everyone that was able to attend, we had a great time and hope you did too. And if you don’t want to take our word for it, Edwin a 7 year-old Minecraft Wizard who attended some of our workshops said it was ‘Epic, awesome and brilliant’, we couldn’t have put it better ourselves. We hope to see you all again very soon.

 

Wavemaker Road Trip: Liverpool

By | Road Trips, Technology | One Comment

They say creativity never goes out of style and this week the Wavemaker team had the opportunity to visit some of the most creative places around….that makes us hipsters right?

After sitting on the carpark that is the M6 for longer than expected we finally arrived in one of the most creatively emerging and exciting cities of the north….Liverpool!

If you have never visited this city steeped in heritage and culture, book your ticket. After its incredible success as European Capital of Culture in 2008, Liverpool’s love of the arts has continued to thrive, so much so, that it is now at the forefront of creative media and digital growth across the Northwest and beyond.

With all this in mind, Wavemaker just couldn’t resist the opportunity to pay this flourishing city a visit, a homage to ‘Our Day Out’ but hopefully without the chaos.

Our first port of call was Baltic Creative. Situated in the Baltic Triangle, what was once one of the most dilapidated areas of the city centre; Baltic Creative was established in 2009 to provide creative space that meets the varied needs of the creative and digital sector. As we walked towards the Warehouse that homes this creative hub; cranes, steel and the buzz of transformation frame the city skyline. It is obvious that the innovation of this area isn’t just reserved for the Baltic Creative site itself, it has caused a wave of regeneration within the Triangle and developers are flooding in.

On entrance to Baltic Creative we were welcomed by a warm, light-filled Cafe that is alive with chatter and the smell of fresh coffee. Definitely time for a brew. We were met by Mark Lawler, the Managing Director of Baltic Creative, from that moment we were hooked.

Baltic Creative offers creative and digital individuals and small business the space to work and grow. It has adopted a unique interior, inspired by a visit to a hotel in Copenhagen in which founding members of the Baltic Creative project slept in sheds. This idea obviously sparked a vision and the warehouse now boasts a line of pine sheds, which is home to various small businesses that are forging their way in the growing digital and creative sector.

The modern mix of concrete grey and golden pine presents itself as a very relaxed and comfortable environment in which to work. A variety of break out areas and compact kitchen facilities show that the people at Baltic Creative are dedicated to keeping their tenants happy and therefore productive.

And for those people who are yet to move up the industry ladder and rent a shed space,  desks are available to lease in the Baltic’s ‘Basecamp’. This is an open plan desk space area, filled with the digital innovators of the future. Everything about Baltic Creative is to benefit the people that work there, and as we peaked through a window to see a digital agency playing a competitive game of lunchtime ping-pong it was clear that Baltic Creative is meeting its aims tenfold.

 

After gorging ourselves on the Cafe’s unbelievable bagels, the Wavemaker team then sailed a short distance through the city to DoES Liverpool on Hanover Street.

Although a smaller setup than Baltic Creative, the ethos to provide a space for creative makers in the city is still the same. Even its name, which stands for Do-Epic-Stuff, is a message and perhaps challenge to the people of Liverpool.  Again, there is desk space on offer, on a pay-as-you-go basis, providing members with the flexibility to use the space only when creative juices are in full flow.

In addition to this, DoES Liverpool also houses a range of equipment in its workshop, including a range of laser cutters, 3D printer, soldering station to name but a few. The enthusiasm of Patrick,our guide,  for all things tech and engineering was infectious. From Raspberry Pi’s programmed to play individual entrance music of staff as they swipe into the office to a 3D printed model of the Radio City Tower that even lights up, DoES Liverpool is really encouraging people to think outside of the box by offering a space in which imagination and creativity is king.

 

With brains brimming with inventive and innovative ideas the Wavemaker team have returned to Wavemaker HQ with a renewed vigor to bring to the city of Stoke-on-Trent a place that embodies everything that we have seen on our travels and more! We want to create a space in which learners, makers and experts can work together, be that on digitial or more practical projects, in an environment that can cater to each individual creative need.  On top of all this we recognise the need to reach out to those not yet aware of the sense of accomplishment, success and renewed aspiration that comes with creative making, and this is a mission that Wavemaker is committed to wholeheartedly. Stoke-on-Trent is a city that deserves spaces like this, spaces where people can make, get messy and learn new skills in the process.  At Wavemaker we are striving everyday for just that, for you…yes you!
By Emma Ikoku

Nice to meet ‘hew

By | Science, Technology | No Comments

One of our regular creators here at Wavemaker is Kai Longshaw. At only 25, Kai from Hanley is one of our youngest makers and is something of an entrepreneur in the engineering world. Just 12 months ago Kai established his own company, Blueprint Robotics, specialising in designing and building robotic products including robotic arms. Kai’s aim is to make affordable robotic products to program, play and use in everyday life. You can find him at a variety of careers and industry fares across the city and nationwide, introducing others to the real world of robots! When he is not inspiring others, Kai uses the facilities here at Wavemaker. His passion for robotics began whilst studying at Staffordshire University, from which he graduated in 2011 completing a BEng (Hons) Robotic Engineering. Since then he has moved from strength to strength and hasn’t looked back.

Kai is now working with the Wavemaker team to develop and deliver robotics workshops, stay tuned to find out more!